Apple

Apple Magic Keyboard

The Apple Magic Keyboard has been out for a while now. Today, I finally got one of them. I’m typing this post on it. I have to say that this iPad experience is much different than my first generation iPad Pro.

The typing is great. The keyboard doesn’t feel cheap and so far, I am loving it.

The downside of this keyboard is the price. It is expensive at $350.00. Is it worth it? I plan on typing up a couple of stories on it so we’ll see.

So far, daddy likes.

New iPad Pro Post

It is tradition for me to post something from my new Apple device. In this case, it is a new iPad Pro. I had the first generation of the 12” iPad and it lasted for about 6 years of pretty heavy use across two users. I gave it to my friend who used it for a while and she used it pretty heavily. The battery died. The motherboard died. I spent about $400 to repair it and then it basically just started falling apart.

I had to make a decision so I decided to just get a new one. 5G/M1 so it is amazingly fast. I love it and I’m glad I got it.

Ok, first post with new device completed.

Why I turned off Private Relay

Apple’s new feature that hides your IP address is an awesome concept. Using any map function and seeing the various places that your phone is reporting your location as…is cool.

What is NOT cool is the fact that private relay prevents websites from loading.

Not cool.

For me, a great example is Slashdot.

If I try to bring it up in my phone and can’t, it is almost always because private relay is turned on. I turn it off and the website loads as normal.

Mac OS 9 To-Go

This is from 9TO5 Mac and is extremely cool. I appreciate the effort that went into creating these. I would not have been able to afford them, but back then I couldn’t afford most Apple products.

I started off imagining what iOS would look like in classic Mac OS style. I kicked things off stylizing iOS with the platinum design and ultimately decided to meld it with classic Mac OS user interface elements. The project became a mobile version of Mac OS 9 otherwise known by its codename, Sonata. I chose to call the software “Mac OS 9 To-Go” and wanted to see what it would look like on a 90s PDA/smartphone. It led to the first product, the Newton Phone.

The rest of the article is here.

Touch ID under Duress

A feature that I would like to see on Apple’s Touch ID devices is what I call a “duress” mode.

Let’s say someone is mugging you and demanding that you unlock your device. What if you assigned a specific finger to something called duress mode that does things behind the scenes while appearing to unlock the device.

You could even have a flash “store front” of apps that load up if you use this particular finger. None of them really do anything and your data is still protected. It may even add an extra layer of security that is required to unlock it by Apple. Once your device is put in duress mode, only authorized people could unlock it. By unlock it, I mean get it back to a state where your normal fingerprint would unlock the device. Apple couldn’t directly unlock it.

By using this finger, you have also alerted family, friends, and anyone else you designate that you are in some sort of duress. These messages could include your GPS location etc.

I think in the future, this type of functionality will be necessary. It might even save lives.

Picture from here.

Windows Development

I downloaded Visual Studio 2019 yesterday to test it out on Windows 11.

The first thing that jumped out at me was the Visual Studio 2019 release. Why not 2021?

The second thing I observed was that VS 2019 doesn’t contain any Windows 11 SDKs.

It is possible that the paid versions of Visual Studio support the new Windows environment which leads me to point out the major important differences between Microsoft and Apple.

Apple gives the developers the tools they need to write new applications at the exact same time they release the operating system. The two things go hand in hand which makes perfect sense when you think about it.

Windows has no such synergy between an OS release and the software you need to develop applications for it. This article makes it sound like Microsoft is really catering to developers but just by reading the article, I’d say otherwise. There are several programs used for different things instead of the single environment the apple provides.

The article mentions gaming and web development and even tools to tweak existing Windows 10 builds but nothing about straight application development. It doesn’t even mention the existence of Visual Studio at all.

I’ve been an Apple developer for a very long time so I guess I’m just probably spoiled.